Sediment is an essential, integral and dynamic part of the hydrologic system. In natural and agricultural basins, sediment is derived from the weathering and erosion of minerals, organic material and soils in upstream areas and from the erosion of river banks and other in-stream sources. As surface-water flow rates decline in lowland areas, transported sediment settles along the river bed and banks by sedimentation. However, because sediments are the ultimate reservoir for the numerous potential chemical and biological contaminants that may be contained in effluents originating from urban, agricultural, and industrial lands and recreational activities, contaminated sediments in rivers and streams, lakes, coastal harbors, and estuaries have the potential to pose ecological and human health risks. The management of sediment quality and quantity in support of ecological and socioeconomic goals is a cause of extensive research, investment and regulatory and public scrutiny, both in Europe and internationally. This chapter examines the management of sediment from a European perspective. The first section discusses the role of sediment management in achieving European ecosystem objectives. Section two summarizes the findings of the EC-funded, demand driven European Sediment Research Network (SedNet). Section three describes a framework risk assessment and management in a major European region, the Venice Lagoon. The next three sections describe aspects of sediment management in an EC accession country, and the host country for this workshop - Slovakia. Section four describes river and lake sediment contamination and related legislation in Slovakia. Section five discusses the assessment and management of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), a major risk driver in Slovakia. Section six discusses a specific class of POPs - PCBS in sediments of a specific region of Slovakia. Finally, Section seven discusses some barriers to successful sediment risk assessment and management, and lists science and infrastructure needs to address these barriers. Whilst all the authors of this chapter are living and/or working in Europe, and the focus is on European perspectives, much work has benefited from international collaborations and we feel that many of the observations and recommendations will have relevance to a broader audience.

Approaches and Frameworks for Managing Contaminated Sediments - A European Perspective

MARCOMINI, Antonio;CRITTO, Andrea;AGOSTINI, Paola;MICHELETTI, Christian;ZUIN, Stefano;
2006

Abstract

Sediment is an essential, integral and dynamic part of the hydrologic system. In natural and agricultural basins, sediment is derived from the weathering and erosion of minerals, organic material and soils in upstream areas and from the erosion of river banks and other in-stream sources. As surface-water flow rates decline in lowland areas, transported sediment settles along the river bed and banks by sedimentation. However, because sediments are the ultimate reservoir for the numerous potential chemical and biological contaminants that may be contained in effluents originating from urban, agricultural, and industrial lands and recreational activities, contaminated sediments in rivers and streams, lakes, coastal harbors, and estuaries have the potential to pose ecological and human health risks. The management of sediment quality and quantity in support of ecological and socioeconomic goals is a cause of extensive research, investment and regulatory and public scrutiny, both in Europe and internationally. This chapter examines the management of sediment from a European perspective. The first section discusses the role of sediment management in achieving European ecosystem objectives. Section two summarizes the findings of the EC-funded, demand driven European Sediment Research Network (SedNet). Section three describes a framework risk assessment and management in a major European region, the Venice Lagoon. The next three sections describe aspects of sediment management in an EC accession country, and the host country for this workshop - Slovakia. Section four describes river and lake sediment contamination and related legislation in Slovakia. Section five discusses the assessment and management of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), a major risk driver in Slovakia. Section six discusses a specific class of POPs - PCBS in sediments of a specific region of Slovakia. Finally, Section seven discusses some barriers to successful sediment risk assessment and management, and lists science and infrastructure needs to address these barriers. Whilst all the authors of this chapter are living and/or working in Europe, and the focus is on European perspectives, much work has benefited from international collaborations and we feel that many of the observations and recommendations will have relevance to a broader audience.
Assessment and Remediation of Contaminated Sediments, NATO Science Series IV: Earth and Environmental Sciences
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10278/18949
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